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Raphael's Music: From Urbino to Rome - Webinar

Date:

07/29/2020


Raphael's Music: From Urbino to Rome  - Webinar

Raphael's Music: From Urbino to Rome, a lecture by Dr. Robert Kendrick, William Colvin Professor in Music, Romance Languages and Literatures, at the University of Chicago.

Wednesday, July 29th at 6pm (CT) 7pm (ET) TO REGISTER CLICK HERE

The event, organized by the Italian Cultural Institute of Chicago, and presented in collaboration with the network of the Italian Cultural Institutes of North America and Canada, is part of the #Raphael500 Webinar Series.

Although music does not play such a prominent role in Raphael's work as in, for instance, Titian or Caravaggio, still he was born and worked in very musical places: Urbino and Rome. This talk wants to highlight and discuss the music at the time of Raffello, who might have likely enjoyed it, played by his contemporary musicians, both in the Marches and in the Eternal City.

 

Robert L. Kendrick works largely in early modern music and culture, with additional interests in Latin American music, historical anthropology, and the visual arts. He is currently engaged in a book project on music and ritual in early modern Catholicism, and recent papers include work on 17th-century opera, Latin American colonial music, and the uses of litanies. He is also one of the co-editors of the forthcoming collected works of Alessandro Grandi, and his essay on "Iconography" is forthcoming in "The Routledge Companion to Music and the Visual Arts".

A member of Milan’s Accademia Ambrosiana, Kendrick received his PhD (musicology) and MA (ethnomusicology) from New York University, after a BA from the University of Pennsylvania, and he is a former Junior Fellow at the Harvard Society of Fellows.

Information

Date: Wednesday, July 29, 2020

Time: From 7:00 pm To 8:30 pm

Organized by : ICI Network North America and Canada

Entrance : Free


Location:

Zoom Webinar

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